Showing Up: Jack Ma, Televised Debates and IAAFUnder18

Most of the job is showing up. And most of the time, Kenyans do a great job of presence and participation. Last week, Kenya’s own Dr. Mukhisa Kituyi brought one of his organization, UNCTAD’s ambassadors Jack Ma to the University of Nairobi. Livecast around the world, this was just after Kenya hosted the biggest youth athletics meet of the season,  IAAF Under 18 Championships, at the Kasarani Stadium – the same venue that hosted President Barack Obama’s public visit only two years ago. Not only that, but both events enter Kenya’s hot election contest, which comes every 5 years or so. The televised candidate debates for deputy presidential and presidential posts revealed that Kenya does expect its own to show up, and be seen, even if the verdict is not yet in on debates deciding elections.

It is not enough to be a passport carrying Kenyan, you have to earn popular approval, as well as all the podium places. Your very presence has to be marked, and your work autographed with…for lack of a better word, Kenyanness (check dictionary for Kenyan beside the word lead also excellence) As a Kenyan, I am extremely proud when we wear our best clothes, and take on the world. No marathon in any city while living in Europe is complete without a 1-2-3 finish by Kenyan men and women. Citizens of Kenya, and I suspect many other countries expect their own to bring the goodies home, expect their politicians to be in the streets and in the tweets, and their athletes to shine in every race.

It is even better now that we have evidence of the democratic process of election campaigning, and I can share with friends and colleagues that Kenya is indeed doing the things it should to stake its own claim as a modern participant in political processes. But, also how could most of the Deputy President aspirants, except Muthiora Kariara fail to show up. He walked away with a huge leap away from being unknown, to breaking through the two-horse race wall-to-wall media blockade and increase the spotlight on his independent deputy presidential candidacy and platform. Also, just yesterday, how could our poised President Kenyatta miss the Presidential Debate?  (Of course, just 2 days ago, he did hold a much subscribed FBLive event) and leave the floor so open for the charismatic candidate former Prime Minister Raila Odinga to literally take the debate away?

So, race tracks, electioneering politicos and billionaires aside – in short. JUST SHOW UP.

How?

  1. Use this checklist (Read about the process of showing up from author Christina Rosalie)manifesto for showing up

 

3. Bring your friends along – and make sure you create a space for students to learn from you.

Naturally, I was happiest to see that one of the biggest purseholders, the Jack Ma, chose the season of the wildebeest migration to bring a heavy delegation( i.e Jack Ma + 38 Billionaires)  to Kenya and speak at the University that has curated some of the best minds in my family and our country, the University of Nairobi.

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Also, take a few minutes to catch the talk by Jack Ma at the University of Nairobi

Are you convinced yet, are you ready to get started on showing up? Ask me more about how you and your favourite people can get together, and start making better connections to your work, and others in your space via the contact form below.

 

I am Josephine Karianjahi, learn more about me and connect with me on Twitter

The Only Race Kenyans Are Not Winning

I am amazed that last week, a Kenyan couple took home the Paris marathon titles for men and women on the same day. In Kenya, winning a marathon is normal, and even expected. However, in the race to find ways to support the Kenyan public to fight gambling addiction, Kenya is losing.

I’m having a hard time finding tears to cry for local game owners whose national taxes through the betting industry in Kenya have been raised from 7.5% to now 50% of all gaming revenue. Mainly because they have proved ineffective in self policing and correction (e.g. underage checks and support for gambling addicts) Their advertising revenues carry major budget share in a variety of publicly accessible media, and almost muzzle journalists’ ability to critically analyze the impact of gaming on Kenyans.

Unlike other addictions, which are more visible now in the media, like alcohol and substance abuse, gambling addiction hardly gets any airplay. Invariably, you hear and see more about the betting promotions than the ails. You read less Op-Eds and see less school based anti-gambling campaigns. Betting ad revenue seems to be carrying the day.

However, if the heavy arm of the taxman cannot provide a temporary umbrella for the suffering of families which are struggling with gambling loved ones, who can?

In a 2017 study conducted by Imperial College and the National Problem Gambling Clinic in the United Kingdom and reported by Science Daily, the most problematic gambling behaviours included sports gambling, and gambling was more likely to activate the same pathways as drug and alcohol cravings. Even more scary? Scant research exists on the impact of problem gambling on adolescents and youth. A 2006 Psychiatry (Edgmont) article estimates that for every one adult with problem gambling, 2 to 4 times as many adolescents are likewise affected – with the consensus being that gambling is worst when it starts at a very young age.

Are we just waiting to cry so hard, we will only be able to cry out of one eye?

Let us get serious.