International Scholarships for Kenyans

Here is a 2017 list of opportunities that got me sharing and retweeting. Just for you, I read through them, so you do not have to – and tailored them for Kenyans. All the best!

  1. Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Kenya – The Government of Kenya regularly updates this list of scholarships directed from various countries for Kenyan citizens. This list is deep, so, definitely worth a try.
  2. Fulbright for Foreign Students (non-US citizens) : These are administered through the country Fulbright Commissions or U.S. Embassies (portal link) For example, if you are from Kenya, you are redirected to the Kenya site, with more information, and an actual email address to a real person. In this case, the Musician and Orchestra Conductor, Mr Ken Wakia, a past Fulbright recipient is the Chairman of the Kenya Fulbright Scholars Association, and is the main contact (email him)
  3. If you are interested in studying in the USA, go to:
    1. EducationUSA : This site offers a wealth of information about scholarships, English language learning, cultural exchanges, and other options available from the US.
    2. EducationUSA Kenya Advisory Services: They offer advice through general sessions held regularly in Nairobi. I attended the general session when I was applying, and later sought further advice through tailored paid sessions back in 2004/5. Now, students have many more options, including #3 below.
    3. For high achieving students (B+ and above in the KCSE) with a desire to study in the USA, they do offer a number of limited slots to assist students with the cost and process of application to the US  through the EducationUSA Scholars program. know at least one young woman who contacted them through the EducationUSA Kenya FB Page, and won one of these spots, and is now studying in the USA.
  4. Austria: Undergraduates, Graduates, Postgraduates and PhD students who are citizens of any country apart from Austria can apply for the Scholarship of the Scholarship Foundation of the Republic of Austria for Undergraduates, Graduates and Postgraduates which is a grant for research promotion, or search the Austrian scholarships database for specific courses of study at Scholarships.at. You can click through and find more information in English too.
  5. Aga Khan Foundation International Scholarship: Nationals of  Bangladesh, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Syria, Egypt, Kenya, Tanzania, Uganda, Madagascar and Mozambique are eligible to apply (and a few others if you are currently resident in France, Portugal, Canada, USA and UK) for postgraduate studies. You must also be interested in development-related studies and have no other means of financing your education.  In case you do not get this one, the AKF shares a longer list of other sources of scholarships to which you can apply too.
  6. Chevening Scholarship for the UK: Chevening is the UK Government’s international awards scheme aimed at developing global leaders. Funded by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) and partner organisations, Chevening offers two types of award – Chevening Scholarships and Chevening Fellowships – the recipients of which are personally selected by British embassies and high commissions throughout the world. Applications for Chevening Scholarships and some Chevening Fellowships open between 7 August and 7 November 2017. Kenya applicants check this page
  7. Endeavour Scholarship Awards in Australia: The Australia Awards–Endeavour Scholarships and Fellowships are the Australian Government’s competitive, merit-based scholarships and fellowships providing opportunities for Australians to undertake study, research or professional development overseas and for overseas citizens to do the same in Australia. But before you apply, check out what other international students have to say about their experiences
  8. Swedish Institute Scholarship Study Scholarships: Scholarships cover both living costs and tuition fees. An estimated 335 scholarships will be available for master’s level studies in Sweden starting in the autumn semester 2017. Kenya is eligible, among other countries. Of importance, is that you need to check their criteria, plus demonstrate you are SI scholarship ready, including 3,000 hours of relevant work, internship or other trustworthy responsibility.
  9. Scholarships to study in Flanders, Belgium are open to African, Asian and Latin American applicants from 31 countries 
  10. NZAID Scholarships in New Zealand: The NZ Government funds several key scholarships for students in the Pacific. However, for Kenyan applicants, the New Zealand Development Scholarship is likely to be your targeted application if you are looking to do a Postgraduate Certificate (6 months), Postgraduate Diploma (1 year), Master’s Degree (1 – 2 years) or your PhD (3 – 4 years) and the New Zealand Commonwealth Scholarship for Master’s Degree (1 – 2 years) + PhD (up to 3.5 years)
  11. Germany DAAD – Graduates with 2 years of work experience can apply for the Deutsche Akademische Austauschdienst / German Academic Exchange Service scholarships. Read more about them 

 

Showing Up: Jack Ma, Televised Debates and IAAFUnder18

Most of the job is showing up. And most of the time, Kenyans do a great job of presence and participation. Last week, Kenya’s own Dr. Mukhisa Kituyi brought one of his organization, UNCTAD’s ambassadors Jack Ma to the University of Nairobi. Livecast around the world, this was just after Kenya hosted the biggest youth athletics meet of the season,  IAAF Under 18 Championships, at the Kasarani Stadium – the same venue that hosted President Barack Obama’s public visit only two years ago. Not only that, but both events enter Kenya’s hot election contest, which comes every 5 years or so. The televised candidate debates for deputy presidential and presidential posts revealed that Kenya does expect its own to show up, and be seen, even if the verdict is not yet in on debates deciding elections.

It is not enough to be a passport carrying Kenyan, you have to earn popular approval, as well as all the podium places. Your very presence has to be marked, and your work autographed with…for lack of a better word, Kenyanness (check dictionary for Kenyan beside the word lead also excellence) As a Kenyan, I am extremely proud when we wear our best clothes, and take on the world. No marathon in any city while living in Europe is complete without a 1-2-3 finish by Kenyan men and women. Citizens of Kenya, and I suspect many other countries expect their own to bring the goodies home, expect their politicians to be in the streets and in the tweets, and their athletes to shine in every race.

It is even better now that we have evidence of the democratic process of election campaigning, and I can share with friends and colleagues that Kenya is indeed doing the things it should to stake its own claim as a modern participant in political processes. But, also how could most of the Deputy President aspirants, except Muthiora Kariara fail to show up. He walked away with a huge leap away from being unknown, to breaking through the two-horse race wall-to-wall media blockade and increase the spotlight on his independent deputy presidential candidacy and platform. Also, just yesterday, how could our poised President Kenyatta miss the Presidential Debate?  (Of course, just 2 days ago, he did hold a much subscribed FBLive event) and leave the floor so open for the charismatic candidate former Prime Minister Raila Odinga to literally take the debate away?

So, race tracks, electioneering politicos and billionaires aside – in short. JUST SHOW UP.

How?

  1. Use this checklist (Read about the process of showing up from author Christina Rosalie)manifesto for showing up

 

3. Bring your friends along – and make sure you create a space for students to learn from you.

Naturally, I was happiest to see that one of the biggest purseholders, the Jack Ma, chose the season of the wildebeest migration to bring a heavy delegation( i.e Jack Ma + 38 Billionaires)  to Kenya and speak at the University that has curated some of the best minds in my family and our country, the University of Nairobi.

2017-07-25 09.31.05

Also, take a few minutes to catch the talk by Jack Ma at the University of Nairobi

Are you convinced yet, are you ready to get started on showing up? Ask me more about how you and your favourite people can get together, and start making better connections to your work, and others in your space via the contact form below.

 

I am Josephine Karianjahi, learn more about me and connect with me on Twitter

Success: Fred Swaniker’s Map

There is no overnight success – even though our get-it-now appetite for news and influence grows. And there are precious few stories on how to make it as an African in Africa – and the world in longhand, from the source. This weekend, Fred Swaniker spoke to me directly, reflecting on his weekend at Middlebury College commencement 2017. He posted a recap of his journey, mostly about how he got to receiving 2 Honorary Degrees one month and two continents apart by the age of 40. With the privilege of living in this era of Africa’s rise, comes with the responsibility of curating our history and learning from one another. I found this snapshot heartening. Well in Bwana Swaniker.

One big part of Swaniker’s post revealed his start as an assistant to a tradesman and fast food salesman, working alongside his mother, scholarship to Macalester College, college summer internships (including one very boring – but skillsrich stint at an insurance company). He then shares some valuable lessons that each of us can take to the bank: including places to get great insight on how businesses work, where to build your professionalism and sense of work-ready requirements, and how to stay the course. I particularly enjoyed his description of walking backwards as a tour guide in college, which I also did in college sharing my experience with prospective students. Check it out below.

Oh, to answer the question posed by Bwana Swaniker; my first job was helping my Mom as a salesman in the family snacks business at a very young age in the mid-1990s.

 

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fswaniker%2Fposts%2F1322602354500477&width=500

Are you trying to challenge yourself to change your own CV and open up the next line in your career? Check out my recent post on getting hired.

Learning with you,

Josephine

The Only Race Kenyans Are Not Winning

I am amazed that last week, a Kenyan couple took home the Paris marathon titles for men and women on the same day. In Kenya, winning a marathon is normal, and even expected. However, in the race to find ways to support the Kenyan public to fight gambling addiction, Kenya is losing.

I’m having a hard time finding tears to cry for local game owners whose national taxes through the betting industry in Kenya have been raised from 7.5% to now 50% of all gaming revenue. Mainly because they have proved ineffective in self policing and correction (e.g. underage checks and support for gambling addicts) Their advertising revenues carry major budget share in a variety of publicly accessible media, and almost muzzle journalists’ ability to critically analyze the impact of gaming on Kenyans.

Unlike other addictions, which are more visible now in the media, like alcohol and substance abuse, gambling addiction hardly gets any airplay. Invariably, you hear and see more about the betting promotions than the ails. You read less Op-Eds and see less school based anti-gambling campaigns. Betting ad revenue seems to be carrying the day.

However, if the heavy arm of the taxman cannot provide a temporary umbrella for the suffering of families which are struggling with gambling loved ones, who can?

In a 2017 study conducted by Imperial College and the National Problem Gambling Clinic in the United Kingdom and reported by Science Daily, the most problematic gambling behaviours included sports gambling, and gambling was more likely to activate the same pathways as drug and alcohol cravings. Even more scary? Scant research exists on the impact of problem gambling on adolescents and youth. A 2006 Psychiatry (Edgmont) article estimates that for every one adult with problem gambling, 2 to 4 times as many adolescents are likewise affected – with the consensus being that gambling is worst when it starts at a very young age.

Are we just waiting to cry so hard, we will only be able to cry out of one eye?

Let us get serious.

 

Hey! Get Ready:Get Hired

I am happy to spend a good amount of time helping family and friends with their resumes and CVs, and it is about time we all get to the good stuff – better skills and employability. I am most interested in helping youth and those yet to be gainfully employed to get ready to take on the job market.

I said:

Apparently, by now – 2017- all university & diploma graduates should not list computer literate and punctual on their resume. It is assumed that you can do a presentation, type and edit and post your own work (and all other computer functions) and that showing up on time should be second nature. Your resume should in fact aim higher and list other things at which you are skilled.

My friend M commented:

It’s not even for recent university graduates. I’m seeing it in “professionals” through age 28…. typing with 2 fingers, late to every meeting or shift and providing what is considered by the individual to be a legitimate excuse each time, inability to use Excel/Word/PPT, etc. And as people are getting their degrees at older ages due to financial struggles and other setbacks, their willingness to learn more than “college” or even to understand that learning doesn’t stop after college leans towards the apathetic. “But I’ve just worked so hard to finish college,” is their thought. The employer’s thought is “But you are still not compliant with state laws, best practices, and professional development requirements to meet your continuing job responsibilities.” And it is over and over and over again, same conversation, different employee.

Yes! to the UN Global Goals, which encouraged us to do more. I agree we can “By 2030, achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all men and women including young people, and persons with disabilities and equal pay for work of equal value” – Global Goal #8 

8.-Good-Jobs-Economic-Growth-V2-640x739

How Do You Get Started ?

I did a quick search and found a few gems:

  1. Barclays has built a great LifeSkills site to allow youth, parents and teachers to : Build a Job Hunting Toolbox, Identify Skills, Gain Experience, Be Inspired
  2. European Union’s Europass offers information for those seeking to develop and create EU based CV and other job-hunting credentials. This is useful for CV based countries outside the EU which operate on principles related to previous EU countries

If you already have a Resume or CV and ready to finally update it:

    1.  Here is what TIME Magazine thinks you should be doing to improve your Resume (Jan 5.2017) including a nice free downloadable template shown below.money_01_30_17_resume-template
    2. Also, find out from the Interview Guys exactly what kind of resume you should be designing. This means, what structure by timeline, how long and whether you should have more or less on your resume.

All the best!

What other questions do you have about skills building, resumes, and creating impact from your presentations?

 

Speaking Kenyan Politics: Language

One language that we have not yet learned is that of speaking to one another across political barriers. My dear Kenya has spent the week in the first set of party primaries for the upcoming general elections. With over 40,000 candidates vying for the complex tiered county governments (47 of them) senate, and parliament, the primaries are much like the athletic heats which determine which Kenyan athletes make it to the international stage. The difference being that winning any of the seats is a guarantee of a hefty salary with perks that may extend beyond one’s term. As you can imagine, the polls are filled with colorful language that does not seem to have limitations. The winners list seems to be filled with new, younger, and untested faces. The first big bit was: Fagia Wote (Sweep Them All Out!) where voters decided they were done with several big names.

And now the major primary contests are all but over. The tribunals featuring primary election complainants are sitting day and night resolving one dispute after another. What started off as a full field of the same faces from the last election has been given a makeover with less of the old, and more new, fresh faces. Some of the mighty have fallen, the unlikely underdogs replacing them. A few of the previously heartbroken losers from previous contests can scarcely believe they are back. We are still mostly armchair political pundits roasting those we managed to catch on camera in the heat of the contests. We still have not learned to speak to one another. We still think it is virtually an anomaly to have someone win a contest in a region that does not match his name. We are still eating the mashed foods of young learners in modern day Kenyan politics.

Also, we are learning the meaning of the phrase: Independent Candidate. This is the place those unsuccessful in the primaries, and unwilling to concede will find their way to the electoral box. Kariuki has a meme you need to take a sec and chuckle at, that describes what this means to the man on the street.

And me, what language am I searching for now? I am a registered voter in Kenya – so I can afford to talk. Thinking deeply about how to write about my choices for MP, as of today being between Boniface Mwangi, Jaguar and Steve Mbogo for Area MP. On that I need new language too.

So who else am I watching talking about Kenyan politics on the internets?

Who are you watching and listening to regarding the elections in Kenya? Drop me a comment or write your own post in response

Josephine